Who was Dr. Harry E. Dunlap?

Mary Ann Wise may have thought she had met the man of her dreams on a train coming from Toledo, Ohio in 1919.  A distinguished doctor by the name of Harry E. Dunlap had been fascinated by the 25-year-old Mary who, according to her, had never had the chance to have young men call on her as other girls her age had.  Mary wanted to find out more about the 35-year-old doctor (though his age was probably closer to 40) and, when asked, Dunlap said he was an Osteopath and a Christian.  The doctor asked her what more she could want and assured her he could support her.  The young couple got off the train and went to Mary’s sister, Edna Irene DeHart’s, home.  The next day, Mary accompanied Dunlap to the interurban station where he was intending to go back to his home in Bucyrus.  Before reaching the station, Dunlap proposed marriage and Mary accepted. The couple was married on Valentine’s Day, 1919, only 43 hours after they had first met.

The honeymoon phase of the relationship was even shorter than the courtship.  The newlyweds returned to the DeHart home and Mary told her sister the news.  Edna suggested having a belling, a custom where family members would ring bells and bang on pots the night of the wedding.  The custom dates back to the middle ages and was intended to keep evil spirits away from the newlyweds.  This is when the doctor had his first “fit,” as Mary called it, saying they were going to get the police and detective on his tail.  That night Mary stated Dunlap put a revolver and knife under his pillow and “made a proposition to me, so terrible, I can not repeat it.”  She said he then choked her and said he was going to take her to Canada, where she would be kept in a house and forced to live with other men.  Dunlap threatened to kill her and she screamed. Edna came into the room, staying with the couple the remainder of the night.[1]

Later, when they went to Mary’s mother’s home, Mary said Dunlap got down on his knees and begged for forgiveness. She also claimed that he offered to give her $1000 if she would not tell everything she knew of him.  When pressed further, the doctor told Mary and Edna he always prayed with his patients and then had them disrobe.  Mary accused Dunlap of being a “white slave crook,” and said one million dollars would not persuade her to go to Canada with him.  Dunlap left for Bucyrus alone, but continued to write and send Mary packages, usually containing references to Spiritualism, which Mary believed to be the work of the devil.

Who was Dr. Dunlap?

Harry Emory Dunlap was born on April 2, 1878, in Butler County, Pennsylvania to John Dunlap and Susan Marvin, one of at least 10 children.  Before coming to Ohio, Dunlap was married in Butler County to Lillie Christy on April 17, 1905.  Like Mary Wise, it was said the couple fell in love at once and quietly got married.  Also, like Mary, the marriage was short-lived.  While returning home on June 1, 1905, Dr. Dunlap, referred to as a “faith curist” by the Pittsburgh Press, found his wife leaving their home with her father William Christy.  Lillie claimed that Dunlap was jealous and threatened to chastise her if she looked at other men.  She also could no longer stand the scanty living conditions.[2]  Dunlap appears to have left the area a short time later.  In 1910, Lillie filed for divorce from Harry Dunlap.[3]

The next we hear of Harry Dunlap is his second marriage to Mary Amelia Bellamy, a Canadian native, in Huron County, Ohio on February 7, 1917.[4]  The marriage would last 14-months and was by all appearances a happy one.  Mary, or Millie, would die on April 12, 1918 of tuberculosis.  In Millie’s obituary, in the Bucyrus Evening Telegraph, Harry Dunlap is referred to as a clairvoyant medium.[5]  The death of his second wife was quite a blow to the doctor.  During his divorce proceeding from Mary Wise, he mentioned that Millie Bellamy was the “purest and sweetest woman that ever lived.”

Further events in 1919 would explain the doctor’s aversion to police and detectives.  On January 29, 1919, Mrs. Rose Scranton was murdered in Marion, Ohio.  On June 3, 1919, Dunlap, along with James Steel, were arrested for the murder.  Was this the reason the doctor was worried about police showing up to the house after his marriage to Mary Wise, fourteen days after the murder?  Could this also be the information that he offer a $1000 to Mary not to divulge? The answer my never be known. Mary never connected the doctor to the murder and Dunlap and Steel were exonerated as the judge declared “not one scintilla of evidence” connected them to the crime.  Though another clue to the life of Harry Dunlap was discovered during the trial.  While searching his room, a trunk was found containing letters from women from all over the state.  Also included in the trunk was a large collection of photographs of women and girls.[6]  Dunlap dismissed the letters and photos, saying they were all from female relatives.[7]

Mary Wise was granted a divorce for Dunlap in August of 1919 and refused the alimony she would have been awarded, saying the money was tainted.  Little is heard from Harry Dunlap after that.  In 1942 he shows up in Fostoria, Ohio on a World War II draft registration card.  At that time, he lists his occupation as Osteopath.  He again disappears until his death in Cleveland, Ohio on January 28, 1966.  Harry Dunlap is buried in an unmarked grave at Hillcrest Memorial Cemetery in Bedford Heights, Ohio.


Sources:

  1. The Mansfield News (Mansfield, OH). 31 July 1919, p. 4.
  2. The Pittsburgh Press (Pittsburgh, PA). 02 June 1905, p. 10.
  3. The Butler Citizen (Butler, PA). 26 January 1910, p. 7.
  4. Ancestry.com. Ohio, U.S., County Marriage Records, 1774-1993 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016.                                                             
  5. The Bucyrus Evening Telegraph (Bucyrus, OH). 12 April 1918, p. 5.
  6. The Marion Star (Marion, OH). 09 June 1919, p. 3.
  7. The Marion Star (Marion, OH). 11 June 1919, p. 7.

Mansfield Hotels: The Brunswick

Barnard Wolff was born on April 17, 1827 in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania and arrived in Mansfield, Ohio, with his wife, around 1850.  Barnard became a prominent architect, carpenter, and builder after he arrived in Mansfield and built such buildings as the Baptist Church, which stood on the corner of Park Ave West and Walnut streets; the Fire Hall; the Union Depot; and the Boston store block.[1]  One of his most notable buildings, at the corner of East Fourth and North Diamond streets, bore his name for its first five years of existence, the Barnard House.  This would later be known as the Sherman House and finally The Brunswick, or Brunswick Hotel.

In April of 1870, the Barnard House opened under the management of John Ditwiler.[2]  The Mansfield Herald reported that Barnard Wolff had spared no expense in the building, making it one of the finest in the city and possibly finer than what stood in many other towns west of Mansfield.  They added that Mr. Wolff should get much praise for the improvements he had made to Fourth Street and for the business which would be drawn downtown.  In January of 1875, Shuman Keister leased the hotel and quickly changed the name to the Sherman House.[3]  The name stayed the Sherman House, or Hotel Sherman until around 1896 when it was named The Brunswick.

The Interior of The Brunswick around 1909.

The hotel had various managers in the 1880s and 1890s, until 1896 when Joel G. Knittle took over.  Knittle remained at The Brunswick until September of 1911 when Barnard Wolff’s son, Fred B. Wolff, took over management with his new wife, Grace Leppo Wolff, upon their return from their honeymoon.  Knittle would die that same month of cancer.  Fred Wolff would serve as service-safety director under two mayors in Mansfield and run the hotel until his death on April 13, 1954.  After his death, his wife, Grace, continued to manage the hotel.

The Brunswick in 1964, shortly before being razed. (Photo by Eileen Wolford)

Grace would run the hotel until her death a few years later on April 22, 1961.  Mansfield Midtown Inc., a local for-profit company who aimed to create more accessible parking downtown, had been wanting to purchase the hotel since before Grace’s death in 1961.  In 1964 they finally acquired the building and it was razed a short time later.  The location is now part of the free downtown parking lot, across the street from the Richland Carrousel Park.


Sources:

  1. Baughman, A. J. A Centennial Biographical History of Richland and Ashland Counties. p. 126-127.
  2. Mansfield Herald (Mansfield, Ohio). 03 March 1870, p. 3.
  3. Ohio Liberal (Mansfield, Ohio). 03 March 1875, p. 4.

From Church to Tavern: The Old First Presbyterian Church

When the new First Presbyterian Church was built in 1893 on North Mulberry Street, the old church remained a city landmark for another 45 years.  It was initially used for a variety of small shops including a second-hand store run by W. Frank McGuire, a harness shop run by John Ervin[1], and a tin and repair shop owned by Al Andrews.  Oftentimes vagrants would be caught sleeping in the basement of the building.  This didn’t appear to be an issue until items from the shops disappeared.[2]  In April of 1900, the Salvation Army moved their headquarters into the building[3], but their time in the old church would last only a year.  The Presbyterian Church sold the building to William Arnold and George Wagner, owners of the Arnold & Wagner Saloon at 23 South Main St, for $8,000[4].

Old First Presbyterian Church on the corner of South Park and South Diamond.

Wagner had big plans for the building when interviewed by the Mansfield News on July 25, 1901.  The church was to be remodeled into a vaudeville theater with seating for 600 to 700 persons.  The price of tickets would be 10 and 20 cents, depending on the seat, and a saloon would be located in the basement.  When Wagner was asked about the Salvation Army remaining in the building he replied, “No, they wouldn’t pay enough.”  A month earlier, the church board and members appeared to be under the impression that the property would not be used for a saloon.  A letter signed by Arnold and Wagner, which was read to church members, stated, “the undersigned say for themselves that at the time the contract was made with the board of trustees they had no intention of using this property for saloon purposes and that they have no intention at this date (June 12) of using the property as such purposes.” 

The church around 1897, before it was sold by the First Presbyterian Church.

On August 31, 1901, Arnold & Wagner’s Saloon had its grand opening in the former Sunday school room of the Presbyterian church.  The old church had been renovated with the removal of the steeple and “the marble slab near the front of the church [had] been boarded over and [contained] the words ‘Union Home.’  The cornerstone laid Sept. 17, 1858, [had] been turned upside down and at the corner of the building [was] a lager beer sign.” Another beer sign stood at the former entrance to the Sunday school room on South Diamond, now the entrance to the saloon.[5]  The saloon also reportably featured a wine room that catered to female patrons. The saloon would often have as many women as men in the establishment[6].

The celebration was short-lived. By October 24, 1901, George Wagner was suing William Arnold and the Presbyterian Church.  A few days later, the building was sold to George W. Bricker[7], but Wagner continued to rent the basement for his saloon.  William Arnold would open Arnold & Co. at 151 North Main. Wagner was no stranger to the law. He sold meals to the jail for prisoners, but also frequently violated the law by selling to underage patrons and opening before 6 AM, which defied the city ordinance.

In this image of the May Building from 1907, part of the old church building, minus the steeple, is visable just past the Orphium Theatre.

Local religious leaders began using the transformation of the old church building as an analogy for the human body.  Dr. F. A. Gould presented a sermon titled “From Church to Saloon; a study of Spiritual Degradation.”   Gould commented that many men, like the church building, had been “wrecked and ruined by strong drink,” but that it was possible to reclaim the body, just as a fine church in Chicago was given new life when worship returned.  Wagner stayed at the old church building until about 1905 when he opened Wagner & Noutz at 21 East Fourth St. with his son-in-law, Frank Noultz.

The 1,300 seat Park Theater opened on September 15, 1938 (Photo from the Mansfield News-Journal, 15 Sep 1938, p. 8)

Later, Charles E. Martin & Bros., copper and iron workers, moved into the building and, in the 1920’s, it was home the The Quality Motor Sales Co. Finally it was the location of the Park Garage and Service Station before being torn down. The old church stood on the corner of South Park and South Diamond until 1938 when the Park Theater was constructed.  The theater was designed by local architect Charles Conklin and noted theater architect Victor A. Rigaumont.   The building was remodeled into the Park Office Building in 1964 and still stands today.


Sources:

  1. 1899 Mansfield City Directory. P. 54.
  2. Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio). 18 OCT 1900, p. 6.
  3. Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio). 08 April 1900, p. 4.
  4. Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio). 07 Jun 1901, p. 6.
  5. Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio). 03 September 1907, p. 8.
  6. Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio). 18 May 1903, p. 3.
  7. Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio). 28 October 1901, p. 2.
  8. Featured image from https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-2831-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

The Ninth Grade City Football Championship

October 26, 1949 program for Appleseed v. Simpson (Sherman Room Archives)

Starting in 1940, with the opening of Johnny Appleseed and the new John Simpson Junior High Schools, an annual football battle would be fought by the ninth grade teams to determine the city champion. These games were immensely popular with over 6,000 fans watching in the late 1940s after the construction of Arlin Field. These games would be complete with cheerleaders, majorettes and marching bands for each school. For twenty years these two schools battled for the title of city’s best, with Simpson taking the advantage 13-8 between the years 1940-1960. In 1961 a new school entered the race, John Sherman. Simpson would repeat as Champion that year and a three-way tie would be the result in 1962. In 1963 John Sherman won its only championship. Johnny Appleseed would be the team to beat in the late 1960s and early 1970s before the championship came to an end with the reorganization of the schools when the ninth grade began attending Mansfield Senior High. Below is a list of the city champions, with the date of the game, score and attendance, if available, and the program above can be seen in full by clicking here.

From the Mansfield News-Journal (Mansfield, Ohio), 25 October 1949, p10.

Junior High City Championship Results 1940-1976

DateWinnerScoreAttendance
October 18, 1940John Simpson6-03,000
October 29, 1941John Simpson26-63,000
November 6, 1942John Simpson45-0N/A
November 3, 1943John Simpson13-9N/A
November 2, 1944Johnny Appleseed18-05,000
October 31, 1945Johnny Appleseed19-04,500
October 31, 1946John Simpson38-04,200
October 29, 1947John Simpson18-64,000
October 24, 1948Johnny Appleseed7-06,600
October 26, 1949Johnny Appleseed13-76,000
October 26, 1950Johnny Appleseed38-195,000
October 17, 1951John Simpson14-64,000
October 5, 1952John Simpson38-63,500
October 21, 1953John Simpson13-66,000
October 20, 1954Johnny Appleseed6-02,500
October 19, 1955John Simpson18-72,500
October 22, 1956John Simpson12-71,800
October 29, 1957Johnny Appleseed26-6800
October 25, 1958Johnny Appleseed36-01,100
November 7, 1959John Simpson42-82,000
October 29, 1960John Simpson32-221,500
October 14. 1961
October 21, 1961
October 28, 1961
John Sherman (defeats Appleseed)
John Simpson (defeats Sherman)
John Simpson (defeats Appleseed)
Champions: John Simpson
14-8
32-20
38-0
N/A
N/A
1,000
October 13, 1962
October 18, 1962
October 25, 1962
John Sherman (defeats Appleseed)
John Simpson (defeats Sherman)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Simpson)
Champions: Three-Way Tie
19-14
22-7
22-20
3,000
2,000
N/A
October 6, 1963
October 12, 1963
October 26, 1963
John Sherman (defeats Simpson)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Simpson)
John Sherman (defeats Appleseed)
Champions: John Sherman
14-6
8-0
6-0
N/A
N/A
N/A
October 3, 1964
October 17, 1964
October 24, 1964
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Simpson)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Sherman)
John Simpson (defeats Sherman)
Champions: Johnny Appleseed
8-0
22-0
14-6
N/A
N/A
N/A
September 29, 1965
October 7, 1965
October 14, 1965
John Sherman (defeats Appleseed)
John Simpson (defeats Sherman)
John Simpson (defeats Appleseed)
Champions: John Simpson
16-14
48-8
24-16
N/A
N/A
N/A
October 15, 1966
October 22, 1966
November 7, 1966
John Simpson (defeats Appleseed)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Sherman)
John Simpson (defeats Sherman)
Champions: John Simpson
20-12
12-0
6-0
N/A
N/A
N/A
October 14, 1967
October 21, 1967
October 27, 1967
John Simpson (defeats Sherman)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Sherman)
John Simpson( defeats Appleseed)
Champions: John Simpson
46-8
26-0
20-0
1,000
N/A
400
October 12, 1968
October 19, 1968
October 26, 1968
John Sherman (defeats Simpson)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Sherman)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Simpson)
Champions: Johnny Appleseed
35-22
8-0
28-7
N/A
1,500
N/A
October 11, 1969
October 18, 1969
October 25, 1969
John Simpson (defeats Sherman)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Sherman)
John Simpson (defeats Appleseed)
Champions: John Simpson
14-8
26-12
16-6
N/A
N/A
N/A
October 10, 1970
October 17, 1970
October 24, 1970
John Sherman/John Simpson Tie
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Sherman)
Johnny Appleseed/John Simpson Tie
Champions: Johnny Appleseed
6-6
13-6
0-0
N/A
N/A
N/A
October 9, 1971
October 16, 1971
October 23, 1971
John Simpson (defeats Sherman)
John Sherman (defeats Appleseed)
John Simpson (defeats Appleseed)
Champions: John Simpson
38-0
8-6
41-6
N/A
N/A
N/A
October 7, 1972
October 14, 1972
October 28, 1972
John Simpson (defeats Sherman)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Sherman)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Simpson)
Champions: Johnny Appleseed
8-0
14-12
14-12
750
1,000
750
October 6, 1973
October 13, 1973
John Simpson (defeats Sherman)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Sherman)
Note: Unable to find results for final game.
28-6
36-6
N/A
N/A
September 21, 1974
October 6, 1974
October 26, 1974
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Simpson)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Sherman)
John Sherman (defeats Simpson)
Champions: Johnny Appleseed

26-14
30-6
N/A
N/A
N/A
October 5, 1975
October 11, 1975
October 18, 1975
John Sherman (defeats Simpson)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Sherman)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Simpson)
Champions: Johnny Appleseed
18-6
19-12
6-0
N/A
N/A
N/A
September 25, 1976
October 9, 1976
October 16, 1976
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Simpson)
John Simpson (defeats Sherman)
Johnny Appleseed (defeats Sherman)
Champions: Johnny Appleseed
24-6
14-0
20-6
N/A
N/A
N/A